ClimateXChange brings scientists and policy makers together to create policies that are informed by the best available evidence.

We act both as a knowledge broker between researchers and policy, and as a research provider. We seek to deliver the best ideas, knowledge and evidence to policy teams, and to deliver effective pathways to impact for Scottish researchers.

We have two ways of working:


1. A co-produced multi-disciplinary research programme

We work in partnership with the Scottish Government and its agencies to respond to questions and requests for evidence, identify upcoming evidence needs, and then independently plan our research and analysis to meet policy timelines. It is a flexible research programme, co-developed with policy colleagues to deliver research syntheses, desk-reviews, in-depth studies, reports and other outputs.


2. Knowledge brokering

We facilitate conversations and broker knowledge across sectors, disciplines and institutions to provide new insights for policy. This is done through a variety of forms, from workshops and seminars to introducing new tools and techniques on topics including priorities for peatland research and community energy development. Knowledge exchange builds relationships and networks, and gives policy-makers access to a research network far beyond CXC.

Read more about our knowledge exchange model

Read our Top Tips for communicating research to policy makers

View our recent projects

Methane-reducing feed additives

In 2018, agriculture was responsible for 18% of Scotland’s total GHG emissions. More than half of this was attributed to methane, with most methane produced during digestion of feed by cattle and sheep. This rapid evidence assessment examines two feed additives – Bovaer and Agolin Ruminant (also known as RumiTech) – which are being developed to reduce these emissions.

Marginal abatement cost curve for Scottish agriculture

To ensure Scotland's climate change modelling uses the most recent data for agriculture, this research updates estimates of the mitigation potential and the cost-effectiveness of four farm technologies and practices which can reduce GHG emissions in Scotland. Some of these measures can be applied to multiple types of livestock, raising the number of mitigation options to 21.

Identifying the economic impact from ultra-low emissions vehicle (ULEV) uptake

Scotland has committed to phasing out new petrol and diesel vehicles in favour of ultra-low emission vehicles (ULEVs). This report identifies the economic impacts of increasing ULEVs, both positive and negative.

The potential for leguminous crops in Scotland

This study assesses potential production of grain and forage legumes, such as beans, peas, lucerne and clover, in Scotland. As well as for nutrition, these crops can help fix atmospheric nitrogen, potentially reducing the need for synthetic fertiliser, a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions.